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BY
BLAIR
JACKSON
JOE JACKSON
Back to New York for "Night and Day II"

by Robyn Flans


You’ve got to hand it to Joe Jackson for having the guts to invite critics to compare his current release to his classic 1982 album, Night and Day. Journalists always summon up the ghosts of artists’ past work anyway, but Jackson was bold enough to actually title this new project Night and Day II. And if it weren’t enough to represent this as a sequel to the most successful album of his career, he actually incorporates that unforgettable bell riff from the hit “Steppin’ Out” into this current album, which seems extraordinarily courageous when it comes to the potential wrath of the journalistic pen. Wasn’t Jackson worried that he might be accused of ripping himself off? Continue..


IN THE GROOVE WITH NICK SANSANO
From Public Enemy to Galactic

by Blair Jackson


New York-based engineer/ producer Nick Sansano has forged a solid career out of working away from the mainstream—out on the edges where creativity thrives without the constraints that commercial considerations impose. The irony of his situation is that in toiling in the studio for so many forward-looking acts during the late ’80s and through the ’90s, he’s also unexpectedly been part of a number of popular albums that were, rightfully, discovered by a public eager to hear something new and different. Sansano’s impressive resume includes engineering, mixing or production on groundbreaking albums by Public Enemy (It Takes a Nation of Millions…), Ice Cube (AmerikKka’s Most Wanted), Bell Biv Devoe (Poison), Sonic Youth (Daydream Nation, Goo and Dirty Boots), Rob Bass (It Takes Two), Manic Street Preachers (Generation Terrorists), the Grassy Knoll (III) and this year’s fabulous New Orleans funk-feast Late for the Future, by Galactic. Toss in CDs by the likes of the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, the Getaway People and a host of unknown (at least in the U.S.) European acts, and you’ve got a broad and fascinating career that’s still accelerating. Continue..


CLASSIC TRACKS

“LONDON CALLING” BY THE CLASH

by Chris Michie

Every now and again a particular place and time is witness to the birth of a social/cultural/political revolution. In 1976, the place was London, and the new movement, which changed the course of popular music, youth fashion and the lives of hundreds of thousands of disaffected teens and 20-somethings, was punk. Led by a stunning series of singles from the Sex Pistols, the English punk movement quickly spawned a rash of exciting, new bands and many memorable, if not always listenable, records. Parents were horrified; the British Establishment predictably overreacted, banning airplay, clubs and concerts; and both tabloid and “serious” newspapers trumpeted the latest real or imagined misdeeds of the new celebrities. A good time was had by all. Continue..






Reprinted with permission from Magazine, November, 2000
2000, Intertec Publishing, A Primedia Company All Rights Reserved


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