How To Fix a Blown Subwoofer?

How To Fix a Blown Subwoofer

Many things can cause your sub to blow. The most common causes include underpowering, overpowering, and feeding the sub with too much audio signal.

When a sub blows, it no longer functions properly. And most people think of replacing or upgrading to a new model as the only option.

But a blown sub doesn’t mean an end to its life.

You can try fixing it on your own and give it a new life. And, thus, save some a significant amount of cash that you can channel to other needs.

Has Your Subwoofer Really Blown?

Before you can even think of fixing a subwoofer, you’ll first need to ensure if it has been blown.

Blown-Subwoofer

You can do this by simply turning the sub on and playing any type of sound on it. Listen closely…if you hear a hissing sound, it’s an indication that the woofer is fully blown. If the sub produces normal sound at low volumes, but it becomes distorted when you increase the volume, then it might be partially blown.

A subwoofer that doesn’t emit any sound directly means it’s broken!

You can also use a voltmeter to see if help you determine if your subwoofer is broken. Turn off your sub and set the voltmeter to read the ohms and then place it on the terminals of your sub. If it reads zero, then it means that your subwoofer has been blown. And if it shows infinity reading, then the voice coil has been damaged.

How To Fix a Blown Subwoofer?

Once you have confirmed that your sub has indeed become blown, it’s time to settle down to fixing it and giving it a new life.

fix-Blown-Subwoofer

Some things you’ll need for this job include:

  • A screwdriver
  • Putty knife
  • Soldering iron
  • Glue

Steps To Follow:

Step #1. Separate the speaker from its enclosure.

For this step, you’ll need to use a screwdriver to help you remove the mounting screws holding the speaker in place.

While still at it, you’d also want to remove all the attached wires (you’d want to check which wire goes where for easy reassembly after you’ve fixed the sub. Wrong wire placement will produce scratchy audio).

Step #2. Remove the speaker surround.

With the speaker fully detached from the enclosure and wires separated, now it’s time to remove the surrounding from the speaker frame.

speaker-surround

You can use a sharp object such as the tester edge or putty knife to help you remove the surrounding easily.

Make sure you remove all the surround plus glue from the speaker frame.

Be extra careful when removing the surrounding as the frame edges can easily get damaged in the process.

Step #3. Removing the voice coil & speaker cone.

With the sharp object you used in the previous step, pry out the speaker cone as well as the voice coil of your subwoofer.

Use a sharp knife to cut the voice coil’s terminal wires to help you easily take out the old cone, coil, and spider.

Step #4. Placing a new coil in place.

Now prepare the new coil you wish to replace the old coil with.

But before you can put the new coil in place, consider removing any dust particles or debris stuck in the voice coil gap (an air compressor will come in handy here).

Now put the new coil in the gap, and place a new spider around it. Place enough glue to the cone, fit it, and carefully place it (the cone) in the center of our new voice coil.

Give it up to 24 hours to dry completely.

Step #5. Putting back the speaker surround.

With the new coil in place, the next thing you need to do is putting back the speaker's surround.

To do this, you simply apply some glue around the edges of the surround (where it’ll come into contact with the speaker frame).

Subwoofer

Then, place the surround on the edges of your speaker frame and cone.

Again, leave the surround for up to 24 hours to dry completely.

Step #6. Finalizing the reassembly process.

Remember the coil terminals you separate in step #3? Well, now is the time to put them back! Simply attach the new coil’s terminal wires to where the old terminals were and use the soldering iron to hold them in place.

TIP: If your new cone comes with no pre-attached wires, consider using small wires to the terminal wires, then create small holes in the new cone. Place the wires into these holes and connect them to the coil with the help of soldering iron.

Lastly, place the speaker back to its enclosure, reattach the wires you separated in step #1 and put back all the mounting screws. And you’re done!

Place your sub back to its location, e.g. under the seat for under seat subwoofer or behind the backseat for a free air subwoofer, for continued amazing low-frequency bass listening experience.

Final Verdict

If you have a blown subwoofer, don’t throw it away or think of replacing it with a brand new one. Instead, consider fixing it using the easy-to-follow guide we have outlined above to give it a new life. You’ll not only save money by repairing your blown sub on your own but you’ll also learn something new in the process.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below

Leave a Comment: